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Awards

Topic Information Award/Contract Number Proposal Information Company Performance
Period
Award/Contract
Value
Abstract

H-SB05.1-001
ADVANCED SAMPLE PROCESSING OF LIQUID, OR SOLID OR AEROSOL SAMPLES, OR A COMBINATION OF TWO OR THREE

NBCHC050122 0511164
(FY05.1 Phase I)
A NEW METHOD FOR SAMPLE PREPARATION DIRECTLY IN AEROSOLS

Chembionics, Inc.
7915 Silverton Avenue, Suite 307
San Diego, CA 92126-6348

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,996.00

Rapid detection of pathogens in air and/or liquid samples is of paramount importance to minimize a potential threat of biological warfare agent attack as well appearance of emerging infectious diseases. Current methods, particularly those that target aerosols are determined by the efficiency and speed of sample preparation which comprises collection of air sample its conversion into a liquid sample and specific detection of pathogens using immuno-based method or those that rely on detection of nucleic acids characteristic for each pathogen. This project concerns a development of an innovative approach to separation of microorganisms in (bio)aerosols where the identification is performed directly in the gas-phase. The methodology is based on the ability to control and monitor the occurrence of biochemical reactions directly in air which enables recognition of pathogens through their specific surface markers or even using their characteristic gene sequences. The Phase I project will demonstrate feasibility of specific binding and separation of simulant microorganisms in air. The proposed sample preparation technology has a potential to be implemented in many different assay schemes which could include both air and liquid samples. Competitive advantages of this technology include: (i) direct and pathogen specific detection in air; (ii) detection time approaching near-real time monitoring; (iii) high sensitivity; and, (iv) low false positives.

H-SB05.1-001
ADVANCED SAMPLE PROCESSING OF LIQUID, OR SOLID OR AEROSOL SAMPLES, OR A COMBINATION OF TWO OR THREE

NBCHC050123 0511198
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Channel to Droplet Sample Extraction and Purification Using Electrowetting Device

Core MicroSolutions Inc.
1100 Glendon Avenue 17th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90024-3588

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,929.00

To develop advanced "channel-to-droplet" sample extraction and purification functions on a compact cartridge that is free of sensitive and complex microfluidic components, Core Microsolutions (CMSS) and Professor Sung Cho of the University of Pittsburgh propose to integrate Electrowetting-on-Dielectric (EWOD) droplet handling and in-droplet concentration capabilties with well proven channel-based separation methods to: a) separate target particles, b) extract the concentrated target particles in a mobile droplet, c) bifurcate the particle mix within the droplet using Dielectrophoretic separation methods for a 2nd level of concentration effects, and then d) drive the target-rich droplet to a sensing point or pipette extraction site. This proposed DHS work will develop the sample extraction and purification methods needed to complement CMSS' ongoing two year $1M NIH Biodefense Phase I grant that will produce the hardware and driving systems needed for novel bacteria immuno-capture and transduction on an EWOD sensing cartridge. This hybridization of channel and droplet-based sample handling on a generic slide cartridge will enable elegant transfer of channel-based separation products to an array of electronic, optical, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Comparisons in cost/performance will be made against existing methods at the end of Phase I.

H-SB05.1-001
ADVANCED SAMPLE PROCESSING OF LIQUID, OR SOLID OR AEROSOL SAMPLES, OR A COMBINATION OF TWO OR THREE

NBCHC050133 0511225
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Development of an advanced fluidic sample bioprocessor

Microchip Biotechnologies Inc
4059 Clipper Court
Fremont, CA 94538-6540

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$100,000.00

This proposal describes a completely automated, NanoBioSentinel sample preparation instrument for biodefense. The NanoBioSentinel will contain two modules: a bead-based Sample Capture and Purification Module (SCPM) front-end and a microchip-based NanoBioProcessor Module. Built partly upon existing devices, the SCPM will use immunocapture and multi-dimensional purifications to process milliliter volumes into microliter volumes. Target organisms and agents are captured, concentrated, and purified on antibody-conjugated beads before lysis followed by bead-based nucleic acid binding and purification in the SCPM. Purified samples on beads are then moved into the NanoBioProcessor Module for fluidic sample processing in a microchip format. The NanoBioProcessor microchips have simple on-chip valves, pumps, and routers and can perform most chemistries. In Phase I, the sample preparation method to be evaluated will be sample preparation for a two-dimensional detection: (1) microscale-Real Time-PCR and (2) microchannel capillary array electrophoresis fragment sizing for confirmation of positives. While we develop the "backend" targeting these chemistries, the NanoBioSentinel will be able perform most chemistries and feed most analytical platforms. The technology will be the basis of sample preparation and analysis systems for pathogen detection, diagnostics and biodefense.

H-SB05.1-001
ADVANCED SAMPLE PROCESSING OF LIQUID, OR SOLID OR AEROSOL SAMPLES, OR A COMBINATION OF TWO OR THREE

NBCHC060082 0512001
(FY05.1 Phase II)
"Channel to Droplet Sample Extraction Analysis (SEA) Cartridge for Food Testing and Homeland Security Applications"

Core MicroSolutions Inc.
1100 Glendon Avenue 17th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90024-3588

06/28/2006
to
07/31/2008
$995,649.00

In Phase I R&D, Core Microsolutions (CMSS) and Professor Sung Cho of the University of Pittsburgh successfully demonstrated advanced "channel-to-droplet" sample concentration and extraction functions on a compact glass chip that integrated state of the art Electrowetting-on-Dielectric (EWOD) droplet handling and purification capabilties with well proven channel-based separation methods. The novel process first separated sample particles within a microchannel, then extracted the concentrated particles from a channel opening in droplet form, and lastly bifurcated the particle mix within the droplet using Dielectrophoretic separation methods for a 2nd degree of concentration. This proposed Phase II work will optimize the "channel-to-droplet" sample extraction concepts demonstrated in Phase I to develop a programmable and user-ready microfluidic cartridge that can concentrate and extract bacterial pathogens from dilute analyte solutions for food testing and Homeland Security applications. Battelle Memorial Institute has been subcontracted to package the CMSS designed microfluidic chips in a rugged, plug-and-play cartridge that will be evaluated using E. Coli, Listeria and Yersinia pestis samples. This disposable and compact Sample Extraction Analysis (SEA) cartridge will output concentrated sample droplets to reduce detection times and uncertainty, while offering programmable droplet delivery and user-selected antibody capture sites to maximize market appeal.

H-SB05.1-002
IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC GAMMA RAY DETECTORS

NBCHC050112 0511064
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Novel Quantum Dot Assisted Semiconductor Gamma Ray Detector

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,989.00

To address homeland security needs, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Gamma Ray Quantum Dot Semiconductor Heterostructure (GammaDot) sensor system. This compact modular system consists of Pb quantum dot (Q-dot) heterostructure laser module, a photodiode module, and a smart electronics module. The Pb Q-dot laser module consists of a stack of heterostructure lasers, which generates a laser output proportional to the incident gamma ray photons captured by Pb atoms. The photodiode module detects this output, and the detected signals are processed and interpreted by the smart electronics module to extract gamma ray spectral data. The GammaDot sensor system will have excellent energy resolution of <0.1% of FWHM, far superior to other detector technologies. The multilayer design enables the GammaDot sensor system to scan a high-energy bandwidth of 20 keV to 3 meV with 90% of the efficiency of the NaI crystal standard. Room-temperature operation and the low operating power of the components result in a low system power consumption of <0.5 W. Mass manufacturing will produce a system that is volume-priced at a few hundred dollars. In Phase I POC will demonstrate the feasibility of the concept by building and testing a proof-of-concept GammaDot sensor. In Phase II POC plans to develop a fully functional prototype that will be integrated with a power supply and data acquisition system. When completed, the entire system could be functionalized into an inexpensive handheld gamma ray spectrometer or adapted into an array system for imaging - including baggage and cargo screening. GammaDot sensors can be adapted for detecting and imaging X-rays for biomedical applications. Because they can be pixilated and produced at ultralow cost, we foresee a large demand for these novel devices. Traditional high energy and nuclear physics experimental efforts could benefit from the compactness and position resolution of GammaDot sensor arrays. The unique arrangement of sensors in the system ensures unprecedented resolution and sensitivity over a wide energy bandwidth.

H-SB05.1-003
IMPROVED HIGH PURITY GERMANIUM COOLING MECHANISMS

NBCHC050120 0511043
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Miniature Long-Life Cooler for Portable Gamma Ray Detectors

Atlas Scientific
1367 Camino Robles Way
San Jose, CA 95120-4925

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,994.98

This proposal describes a battery operated cryocooler to be used for cooling High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, commonly used for the detection of gamma rays. HPGe detectors are highly suitable for identifying nuclear materials, which is of great interest in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) applications. HPGe detectors need to operate near 110 K requiring refrigeration for portable HPGe detectors. Portability is highly desirable and can be accomplished by means of a standalone, compact, low-vibration, efficient cryocooler. Power consumption is to be sufficiently low so that the overall system including battery packs is indeed portable. Various existing cryogenic refrigeration systems are thought not to be applicable for the current DHS application either for reasons of excessive power consumption, vibration or system mass, or for lacking reliability and efficiency. To address the refrigeration issue, we propose to develop a miniature pulse tube cooler. High frequency, pulse-tube coolers (PTCs) represent the most promising technology for achieving lightweight standalone cryocoolers. Applications of this cooler include cooling of infrared and gamma ray detectors, cooling of electronics, and for use in the biomedical industry.

H-SB05.1-003
IMPROVED HIGH PURITY GERMANIUM COOLING MECHANISMS

NBCHC050113 0511114
(FY05.1 Phase I)
High Performance Long-Life Cooler for Transportable Gamma Ray Detectors

Atlas Scientific
1367 Camino Robles Way
San Jose, CA 95120-4925

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,999.98

This proposal describes a transportable cryocooler to be used for cooling High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, commonly used for the detection of gamma rays. HPGe detectors are highly suitable for identifying nuclear materials, which is of great interest in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) applications. HPGe detectors need to operate near 110 K requiring refrigeration. High cooling performance is highly desirable and can be accomplished by means of a compact, low-vibration, efficient cryocooler. Various existing cryogenic refrigeration systems are thought not to be applicable for the current DHS application either for reasons of excessive vibration or system mass, or for lacking reliability and efficiency. To address these refrigeration issues, we propose to develop a high performance pulse tube cooler. High frequency pulse-tube coolers (PTCs) represent the most promising technology for achieving reliable lightweight cryocoolers. Applications of this cooler include cooling of infrared and gamma ray detectors, cooling of electronics, and the biomedical industry.

H-SB05.1-004
LOW COST UNDERWATER THREAT DETECTION SYSTEM

NBCHC050124 0511138
(FY05.1 Phase I)
High Resolution Underwater Passive Threat Detection System

Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc.
2520 W. 237th Street
Torrance, CA 90505-5217

06/24/2005
to
01/06/2006
$99,995.00

We propose to develop a highly sensitive, low cost system for underwater perimeter control. The setup, designed for protection of waterside facilities and infrastructure, consists of a fiber-optic cable placed in front of a critical or high-value asset, connected to a compact readout system. A single source sends out acoustic sonar pulses. Sensor structures embedded in the fiber in conjunction with innovative mechanical features and a novel readout system form an ultra-sensitive distributed detector for backreflections of any approaching object. A sophisticated data processing algorithm reconstructs the features of the possible intruder, compares it to its decision table and triggers an alarm if indicated. Built-in temperature compensation and self-referencing will allow reliable measurements in diverse environmental conditions. In Phase I, IOS will develop a working model of the sensing array and deliver it to HSARPA for demonstration. A fully functional prototype will be developed and demonstrated in Phase II.

H-SB05.1-004
LOW COST UNDERWATER THREAT DETECTION SYSTEM

NBCHC050134 0511211
(FY05.1 Phase I)
An Underwater Threat Detection System Employing Low-Cost Sensing and Advanced Algorithms

Toyon Research Corporation
6800 Cortona Drive
Goleta, CA 93117-3021

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$100,000.00

A vast array of high-value installations are situated within or near waterways. With such a large number of vulnerable targets, current threat detection schemes are too costly to provide sufficient levels of protection. At the same time, with 95% of material goods arriving via ports and waterways, any new system must offer sufficient performance to prove effective in such an active environment. A new paradigm in identification and localization of targets of interest is the use of large numbers of low-cost distributed sensors rather than single high-fidelity sensors. This proposal seeks to provide an autonomous system that mates arrays of underwater transducers to novel fusion, tracking, and target classification algorithms. Our sensing approach is based on the concept of active forward scattering. Sets of measurements from the sensor array are passed to a central control center, which can be located on- or off-site and uses COTS computer hardware. The particle filter will be used for fusion and tracking due to the ease with which it can manage nonlinear measurements and negative information. A Bayesian network will be used for target classification because the algorithm can incorporate an array of target attributes including signature, velocity, bearing, maneuverability, etc.

H-SB05.1-005
INNOVATIVE LESS-LETHAL DEVICES FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT

NBCHC050108 0511073
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Inertial Capacitive Incapacitator

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,992.00

The Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency is seeking an innovative less-lethal untethered electromuscular disruptor device that is inexpensive, safe, lightweight, man portable, and easy to use to stop illegal behavior of individuals, groups, or crowds. The physical environments vary from a small room to a city street or a sports stadium. The goal is to temporarily incapacitate, confuse, delay, or restrain a person or persons when lethal force is not appropriate or the use of lethal force could cause collateral effects such as injury to bystanders, or damage to property or the environment. To meet this need, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Inertial Capacitive Incapacitator (ICI) based on a unique combination of a soft ring airfoil with a compact, thin film voltage generator. The ICI will be powered by inertial force to produce a high-voltage discharge of limited energy. The ICI device can be optimized to fit virtually any launcher. Because of the low impact momentum needed, the ICI is safe and can be launched even by a pneumatic pistol. The ICI is charged when it is fabricated, and can maintain this charge for decades. The electric energy delivered does not depend on the distance to the target. The proposed ICI avoids the drawbacks of current nonlethal munitions: it is not tethered to the launching platform, and is low-cost, lightweight, and easy to use. Commercial products will include modified nonlethal tools and weapons for law enforcement, security guards, personal self-defense, and possibly hunting. With their single stun dartless action, the novel ICI based projectiles will dramatically reduce the risk of accidental lethal injury, and can replace present nonlethal weapons. The ICI technology will replace blunt trauma with much safer electrical incapacitation.

H-SB05.1-005
INNOVATIVE LESS-LETHAL DEVICES FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT

NBCHC050104 0511135
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Less-Lethal Eye Safe Handheld LED-Based Incapacitator for Law Enforcement

Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc.
2520 W. 237th Street
Torrance, CA 90505-5217

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,999.00

Intelligent Optical Systems (IOS) has developed and demonstrated a prototype dazzler that utilizes an array of super-bright Light Emitting Diode (LED) clusters to produce disorientation and strong flashblindness with afterimages. In this project, IOS proposes to develop a significantly improved device that can operate at distances up to 50 feet at the maximum permissible eye-safe level. Two new innovations will be incorporated into the device: (1) a rangefinding technology that will permit rapid adjustment of the radiant power to the maximum eye-safe level, in real time, at any of the operational target distances; and (2) a novel scanner that will allow the device to cover an area much larger than the beam size, while still providing a flash frequency and exposure level as effective as the single beam over the entire area. Control electronics and a preprogrammed chip will be used to allow operation at randomly varying frequencies within the band of maximum effectiveness, and to utilize several colors of light to enhance disorientation.

H-SB05.1-005
INNOVATIVE LESS-LETHAL DEVICES FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT

NBCHC060081 0512003
(FY05.1 Phase II)
Less-Lethal Eye Safe Handheld LED-Based Incapacitator for Law Enforcement

Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc.
2520 W. 237th Street
Torrance, CA 90505-5217

09/14/2006
to
09/13/2008
$770,000.00

In Phase I, Intelligent Optical Systems (IOS) developed and demonstrated a hand-held, battery operated prototype nonlethal weapon that utilizes an array of super-bright light emitting diodes (LEDs) to produce flashing light that causes disorientation and flashblindness in the target subject(s). To enhance the effectiveness of the LED-based Incapacitator (LEDI), IOS incorporated and evaluated such supplementary features as multiple colors, random and periodically changing frequencies and intensities of light, an embedded flashlight, a multidirectional strobe, and an ultrasonic rangefinder, which provides eye-safe operation. IOS also outlined, by establishing the preliminary calculations for narrow beam forming optics and a powerful die cluster on a single substrate, the development of a device that will operate at power levels close to the eye-damage threshold, yet in hand-held format. In Phase II, IOS will develop and fabricate a LEDI, and tests will be performed on human subjects. The final Phase II LEDI prototype will operate at the eye-damage threshold at distances up to 21-25 feet, and produce strong flashblindness with afterimages at distances up to 50 feet. The LEDI is intended to serve as a complementary supportive weapon for the nonlethal Tazer and other more lethal equipment of military and security personnel.

H-SB05.1-006
SECURE CARTON SYSTEM

NBCHC050111 0511032
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Secure Carton Integrated Electronic Remote System

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,999.00

The Department of Homeland Security is seeking innovative approaches and key technologies for securing intermodal cargo, and for integrity monitoring with tracking capability at the level below that of the ISO container. This technology is to include a secure tamper-evident skin and active RFID with a secure information system, and the capability of arming and monitoring the system, with local communications for reporting any integrity breach. Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new four-security-layer Secure Parcel ISO Distributed Enhanced RFID (SPIDER) system based on: smart electric skin with conductive ink; unique RFID communication with container; protection against sophisticated intrusion; geospatial analysis tracking, and software for effective manipulation and analysis of parcel status in a Web-GIS environment. In Phase I POC will design the critical material, electronic, and software components, and develop a working prototype for the first two security layers of the SPIDER. Phase II will culminate in a SPIDER fully functional prototype. POC's experience in the web-imprinting-fabrication process, electronic packaging, electronic components, and GIS not only ensures the smooth integration of SPIDER into U.S. Homeland Security ACSD and MATTS but also will attract investment to enter the international container shipping and global logistics markets. The integration of POC's cost-effective SPIDER technology into the ACSD and MATTS programs for secure ISO containers will increase the productivity and accuracy of these tools. POC's SPIDER not only meets the major DHS requirements for cargo integrity monitoring, but also has significant commercial applications in international intermodal shipping and global logistics.

H-SB05.1-006
SECURE CARTON SYSTEM

NBCHC060086 0512009
(FY05.1 Phase II)
Secure Carton Integrated Electronic Remote System

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

06/26/2006
to
09/25/2008
$749,995.00

To address the Department of Homeland Security need for a novel secure carton integrated with intermodal ISO containers, and the Advanced Container Security Device, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) has developed a novel "carton-centric" Secure Parcel ISO Distributed Enhanced RFID (SPIDER), which will enhance container-based ACSD and RFID tags with a low false alarm rate, responding to a broad variety of security scenarios to protect against sophisticated carton intrusion. The three-security-layer SPIDER architecture includes: smart skin, wireless status reporting, and authentication and ID. The smart skin is based on a unique, X-ray-transparent concealed electrical cage. The system can be entirely passive, inductively drawing power from the container RFID. Most of the technology for SPIDER mass production is well established. In Phase I, two generations of working prototypes were developed, fabricated, and demonstrated to DHS and to an Under Secretary of Defense. In Phase II we will extend the SPIDER concept to two protective network meshes: one similar to that of Phase I, and a new one with stretching capability to dramatically improve false alarm rate. SPIDER will find applications in cargo screening, container inspection, and special-purpose packages for sensitive items: pharmaceuticals, electronic chips, weapons, and classified materials.