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Awards

Topic Information Award/Contract Number Proposal Information Company Performance
Period
Award/Contract
Value
Abstract

H-SB011.1-005
Mitigation of Contact Lens, Eye Surgery, Pupil Dilation, and Other Challenges on Iris Recognition

D11PC20142 1111074
(FY11.1 Phase I)
Mitigation of Contact Lens, Eye Surgery, Pupil Dilation, and Other Challenges in Iris Recognition

Member of the Family LLC
670 Ritchie Highway
Severna Park, MD 21146-3979

05/15/2011
to
03/30/2012
$149,400.00

Member of the Family LLC`s (MOTF) proposal is designed to study and analyze the effects of contact lens usage, eye surgery and various types of pupil dilation as they relate to the accuracy and performance of current iris recognition systems. MOTF`s study will be based on clinical data that will be gathered in both hospital and private practice settings. This will assure that we include in the study as wide a range of medical and surgical subjects as possible within the timeframe and scope of the study. We expect that this preliminary study will provide sufficient raw data for us to begin to develop approaches to detect and mitigate obstacles to iris recognition. Phase II of the project would provide the additional time and resources to expand the biometric database to more completely consider anomalies to recognition that may be discovered in Phase I. MOTF is confident that there are numerous private and government applications for this next step technology to make commercialization of the findings attractive to system manufacturers and users.

H-SB011.1-005
Mitigation of Contact Lens, Eye Surgery, Pupil Dilation, and Other Challenges on Iris Recognition

D12PC00288 FY11.1-H-SB011.1-005-0007-II
(FY11.1 Phase II)
Mitigation of Contact Lens, Eye Surgery, Pupil Dilation, and Other Challenges in Iris Recognition

Member of the Family LLC
670 Ritchie Highway
Severna Park, MD 21146-3979

07/15/2012
to
07/30/2014
$749,990.00

Member of the Family LLC's proposal is designed to study and analyze the effects of contact lens usage, eye surgery and various types of pupil dilation as they relate to the accuracy and performance of iris recognition systems. Additionally we propose to determine whether or not appropriate measures exist or can be created to mitigate the effects of these factors in iris recognition. While others may have approached similar studies from academic standpoints, MOTF's study will be based on clinical data that will be gathered in both hospital and private practice settings. This will assure that we include in the study as wide a range of medical and surgical subjects as possible within the timeframe of the study. We expect that this study will provide sufficient raw data for us to analyze so that we should be able to begin to develop approaches to detect and mitigate obstacles to iris recognition. Phase II of the project will provide the additional time and resources to expand the biometric database to more completely consider the challenges to recognition observed in Phase I. MOTF is confident that there are both private and government outlets for the commercialization of this technology.