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Awards

Topic Information Award/Contract Number Proposal Information Company Performance
Period
Award/Contract
Value
Abstract

H-SB06.1-001
AEROSOL COLLECTION INTO LOW ANALYSIS VOLUMES (ACLAV)

NBCHC060106 0611211
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Aerosol Collection into Small Liquid Volumes for Biological Assays

Aerosol Dynamics Inc.
935 Grayson St.
Berkeley, CA 94710-2640

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,996.00

Detection systems for aeropathogens require the concentration of airborne particles from large volumes of air into small volumes of liquid. This proposal addresses this need through droplet encapsulation of airborne particles, with subsequent capture into a microliter-sized collection reservoir. Droplet encapsulation is accomplished through our company's proven, patented growth tube technology. The encapsulation occurs rapidly, within 5 milisecs, by condensational growth in region of water vapor supersaturation. The supersaturation is created in a thermally-diffusive laminar flow. No steam or temperature extremes are required. The final droplet size can be controlled, and for small particles is independent of the initial particle size. In Phase 1 this approach will be explored for the collection of 0.5 micrometre to 10 micrometre particles from an air flow of 10 L/min into liquid volumes of 30 microliter or less. Results will be used to assess the power, size and performance to be expected for a Phase 2 system that will be scaled to air flow rates of 100 L/min.

H-SB06.1-001
AEROSOL COLLECTION INTO LOW ANALYSIS VOLUMES (ACLAV)

NBCHC070117 0612022
(FY06.1 Phase II)
Aerosol Collection into Low Analysis Volumes

Aerosol Dynamics Inc.
935 Grayson St.
Berkeley, CA 94710-2640

08/06/2007
to
02/05/2011
$720,000.00

Detection systems for aeropathogens require the concentration of airborne particles from large volumes of air into small volumes of liquid. This proposal addresses this need through droplet encapsulation of airborne particles, with subsequent capture into a microliter-sized collection reservoir. Droplet encapsulation is accomplished through our company's proven, patented growth tube technology whereby a region of water vapor supersaturation is created in a thermally diffusive, laminar flow. No steam or temperature extremes are required. Flow lines are smooth, facilitating the transport of coarse particles. It provides efficient capture of particles in the small-submicrometer size range, as is needed for virus detection. The collection step is gentle, and non-drying, to yield a concentrated yet viable sample. A 100L/min collection system will be constructed to provide collection into a 300 microliter liquid volume. The size-dependent collection efficiency, internal losses and efficiency of elution will be measured over the size range from 0.2 to 10 micrometre using inert liquid and solid particles. The final prototype system will be tested with bare and agglomerated bacterial spores with assessment of collection efficiency, viability, and suitability for PCR analyses.

H-SB06.1-002
RELIABLE PEROXIDE-BASED EXPLOSIVES DETECTION WITH LOW FALSE ALARM RATE

NBCHC060110 0611057
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Portable Raman Optical Trace Explosive Detection System

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$100,000.00

To address the need for a portable device to detect trace amounts of peroxide-based homemade explosives (HME) on individuals and packages in public transportation settings, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Portable Raman Optical Trace Explosive Detection (PROTEX) system. This man-portable noncontact system will agitate, sample and concentrate an air sample near the test object, followed by Raman optical analysis of this concentrate to determine whether HME or other explosive constituents are present. It features a throughput of three individuals/packages screened per minute; high sensitivity from ppm to ppb levels or lower of peroxide explosive vapor and single-microgram-sized particulates of HME residue; and high specificity with a false alarm rate well below 5%. The operationally safe system will require no consumables, and will consume <10 W of battery power. In Phase I POC will assemble a proof-of-concept prototype and test it on surrogates. In Phase II we will develop a prototype system for laboratory and field testing and estimate its false alarm rate. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) can use this system to screen passengers and baggage at airports. The system will also benefit environmental pollution monitoring as well as security monitoring during military and peacekeeping operations.

H-SB06.1-003
ENHANCED EXPLOSIVE SAMPLE COLLECTION AND/OR PRECONCENTRATION SYSTEMS

NBCHC060113 0611133
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Vapor/Particle Collector/Concentrator for Explosives Trace Detection

Syagen Technology, Inc.
1411 Warner Ave.
Tustin, CA 92780-6461

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,840.00

In this Phase I project, Syagen will demonstrate the feasibility for a vapor/particle sampler for explosives de-tection consisting of a collection probe and a concentrator. We will demonstrate the interface of the sampler to mass spectrometry (MS), however, it can also be used for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), gas chromatography (GC), and essentially all forms of optical spectroscopies that measure vapor composition (e.g., infrared, Raman, ultraviolet, mil-limeter wave, etc.). The sampler will be based on a high-throughput snorkel and sampling probe capable of collecting particles and vapor onto a concentrator device. The sampling probe will use a proven air-shower impinger to dislodge residue and particles from surfaces without making contact. The probe unit will also include an IR lamp assembly to optionally heat surfaces to improve vapor collection. The vapor, particles, and dislodged residue are swept through the sampling snorkel to a vapor/particle concentrator. The vapor and particles are then thermally desorbed to the detector for analysis. The total sampling cycling time can be as short as 5 s. In Phase I we will demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed vapor/particle collector/concentrator. The proposed automated sampling device for collecting and concentrating explosive vapors and particles for explosives trace detection meets critical needs in homeland security and the DOD. The benefit is high performance for a variety of screening situations (e.g., personnel, vehicle, baggage, surfaces). Furthermore the sampler can be interfaced to essentially any trace detector. The device has a very flexible CONOPS for a variety of applications including: (1) rapid screening of people, baggage, and vehicles, (2) force protec-tion, (3) first response, (4) treaty compliance monitoring, (5) general environmental monitoring.

H-SB06.1-004
SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR A SOUTHERN BORDER SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

NBCHC060116 0611064
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Signal Processing for a Southern Border Surveillance System

Toyon Research Corporation
6800 Cortona Drive
Goleta, CA 93117-3021

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$100,000.00

Successfully monitoring vast areas of landscape is crucial for maintaining security across the United States border. We envision the solution to this problem to consist of a search sensor, such as a radar, that cues an EO/IR sensor which provides recognition and tracking capabilities. In this Phase I effort, we propose to focus on the signal processing required to support the EO/IR recognition and tracking function. We propose a software solution that detects and tracks moving and stationary targets that may be closely separated. Our signal processing solution includes frame registration, frame differencing, target segmentation, target tracking, and target feature extraction. Such techniques have already established high target detection performance while maintaining low numbers of false alarms. We will address requirements for preventing intruders from crossing the Southern border and the considerations for retrieving illegal entrants that may evade border security. Further, we show how real-time processing capability can be achieved through efficient candidate target segmentation, followed by a hierarchical classification structure. Throughout, we demonstrate how storage and bandwidth requirements can be minimized, to enable deployment of the complete system in a variety of resource-constrained environments, leading to reduced operator workload and improved surveillance effectiveness.

H-SB06.1-004
SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR A SOUTHERN BORDER SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

NBCHC060117 0611066
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Signal Processing for a Southern Border Surveillance System

AETC Incorporated
8910 University Center Lane, Suite 900
San Diego, CA 92122-1012

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$100,000.00

The U.S. Border Patrol is in critical need of improved surveillance for detection of people and vehicles illegally crossing the Southern Border, particularly in rural areas. AETC will conduct a Phase 1 feasibility study of acoustics-based surveillance and signal processing techniques to address the Southern Border problem. The overall system concept encompasses a network of low-cost acoustic sensors and advanced signal processing for automated detection and classification of border crossings. This study will (1) identify specific signatures for acoustic monitoring of people and vehicles crossing the border, (2) design and implement advanced signal processing algorithms required for automatic detection and classification of these signatures, (4) define sensor configuration and front-end hardware, (3) determine maximum detection range, (4) estimate PD and PFA performance, and (5) assess cost per unit distance of border monitored for this capability. In addressing this Homeland Security problem, AETC will leverage substantial knowledge and expertise in acoustic signal processing derived from relevant experience in U.S. defense applications. As a commercialization strategy, AETC plans to license the technology developed under this SBIR to manufacturers who will produce and sell platforms for border and facility security. Potential end-users would include the U.S. Border Patrol, military, and law enforcement agencies.

H-SB06.1-004
SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR A SOUTHERN BORDER SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

NBCHC060118 0611113
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Signal Processing for a Southern Border Surveillance System

Information Systems Laboratories
10070 Barnes Canyon Road
San Diego, CA 92121-2722

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,950.39

There is a vital need to secure the long southern border of the United States, much of its length passing through rural and desolate areas. This can be achieved using a fixed land-based sensor network to detect people and vehicles crossing the border. ISL and DMT have identified a system architecture which makes a southern border security system achievable at an affordable price. A surveillance system based on a ground-moving target indicator (GMTI) radar system designed to detect slow-moving, low radar cross section (RCS) targets and an electro-optical (EO)/infra-red (IR) camera can provide the coverage, update time, all weather performance, and cost effectiveness to make a border surveillance system practical. The key to making the surveillance system effective, and the focus of this effort, is to develop signal processing algorithms to achieve a high probability of detection on small, slow moving targets, such as walking people, in a high clutter environment while maintaining a very low false alarm rate. During Phase I, ISL and DMT will investigate an innovative approach to incorporate the knowledge of the surrounding terrain, wind-blown clutter, sensor fusion, and target tracking to achieve a high detection probability and minimize the false alarm rate.

H-SB06.1-004
SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR A SOUTHERN BORDER SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

D14PC00228 FY06.1-H-SB06.1-004-0002-CRPP
(FY06.1 CRPP)
Signal Processing for a Southern Border Surveillance System

Toyon Research Corporation
6800 Cortona Drive
Goleta, CA 93117-3021

09/20/2014
to
01/31/2017
$198,647.74

High-value facilities employ a variety of ground and video sensors to provide perimeter protection and to alert security personnel to possible incursions. Typically, the surveillance process requires human operators to view video and verify targets are present; unfortunately, due to the large number of video feeds, some alerts may go unnoticed. Automating the video surveillance components of this security system will allow for cost savings to be realized as the required personnel resources are reduced and security can focus on high-priority feeds with targets present. Toyon Research Corporation has developed a video analytics system, called VideoPlus, through a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project. VideoPlus has found applicability in long-range surveillance applications along the US Southern Border. The goal of this Commercialization Readiness Pilot Program (CRPP) is to transition and commercialize the VideoPlus technology to the high-value facility protection community at sites within the United States. On this effort, Toyon will integrate VideoPlus with a deployed surveillance infrastructure and conduct a live Performance Test with third-party validation. Stakeholders will assess VideoPlus and report its capabilities and limitations for use in the high-value facility monitoring application. Upon completion of the effort, transition stakeholders will have obtained a greater understanding of how VideoPlus can be integrated for use in a variety of operational environments.

H-SB06.1-005
HUMAN DETECTOR FOR CARGO SHIPPING CONTAINERS

NBCHC060145 0611036
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Human Occupancy Detection System

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$100,000.00

To address the HSARPA need to detect humans hiding in cargo shipping containers, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Human Occupancy Detection (HOD) system. The HOD will be based on POC's sensor fusion and neural networks pattern recognition technology, combined with a novel chemical gas sensor array. The HOD detects human presence by detecting and identifying major human respiratory and flatus gases in a confined cargo shipping container. The HOD is packed in a porous metal box (<2 in. x 2 in. x 1 in.) and covertly installed inside the cargo container. It can be operated either standalone or integrated into the Advanced Cargo Security Device. Several HODs can be installed at different container locations to increase detection accuracy. The HOD can operate on a 1.5 V AAA battery (2000 mAh) for more than 1400 continuous hours, and stay operational under the various conditions in which shipping containers operate. It costs <$150 with integrated COTS components. In Phase I POC will demonstrate the feasibility of HOD by testing it in simulated cargo conditions. In Phase II POC plans to fabricate a preproduction prototype HOD and test it in a real intermodal shipping cargo container evnvironment.

H-SB06.1-005
HUMAN DETECTOR FOR CARGO SHIPPING CONTAINERS

NBCHC060133 0611048
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Membrane-Based Interferometric Respiration Sensor

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,993.00

To address the national need to increase transportation security and to prevent human smuggling within cargo containers, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop Membrane-based Interferometric Respiration Sensor (MIRS), based on a semipermeable, membrane that preferentially transmits carbon dioxide and an active interferometric readout to detect minute periodic variations in carbon dioxide concentration within a container caused by human respiration. The MIRS incorporates on-board data analysis to detect the presence of humans with low-false alarm rates. The MIRS will have a wireless transmitter to send an alarm to security personnel and to identify the container and time of alarm. It will consume <1 mA of battery current, thus ensuring long-term operation without battery change. The MIRS will be low-cost, easy to install and easy to use, compact, and rugged, and capable of operation in harsh environmental conditions. The compact, MIRS can also be used to search for victims of natural disasters (earthquakes, hurricanes), and for medical applications (as a capnometer). In Phase I POC will demonstrate the feasibility of MIRS by fabricating an experimental prototype and demonstrating its performance in various environmental conditions. In Phase II POC plans to develop engineering prototypes for field evaluation and testing.

H-SB06.1-008
BOTNET DETECTION AND MITIGATION

NBCHC060120 0611093
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Intelligent Microagent Grid for Botnet Detection and Mitigation

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,997.00

To address the Homeland Security's need for detecting and mitigating bots and botnets, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Intelligent Microagent Grid (IMG). The IMG system is based on a new microagent model that learns the behavior of bots and botnets and stops intrusive and malicious activities by equipping new binary search engines, neural nets, systematic detection algorithms from known and unknown behavior of bots and botnets, and an inline sniffing mechanism. IMG will increase cyber security by implementing a multi-layer security mechanism with specialized microagents that monitor network traffic and ports from a local area network to a wide area network. The system will be a scalable, interoperable, reusable, and distributed cyber defense tool via Web services and application programming interface built with object oriented programming language. In Phase I POC will demonstrate the feasibility of the IMG prototype by testing with bots and botnets on real networks. Our Phases I and II efforts will focus on developing an operational prototype that will be transitioned to a commercial product in Phase III. The IMG software will benefit commercial Internet and network security products for federal, state, and local governments, particularly the Department of Homeland Security.

H-SB06.1-009
MANAGING MULTI-MEDIA SURVEILLANCE INFORMATION NETWORKS

NBCHC060139 0611108
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Network-centric Inter-channel Fusion for Multi-media Surveillance

Broadata Communications, Inc.
2545 W. 237th Street, Suite K
Torrance, CA 90505-5229

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,972.00

The Department of Homeland Security is seeking innovative highly-scalable information processing technologies to manage multimedia surveillance information networks. To address this need, Broadata Communications Inc. (BCI) proposes a highly innovative Network-centric Inter-channel Fusion (NIF) system solution. The NIF system is leveraged on a unique network-centric signal processing technique to automate inter-channel multimedia data compression and fusion, while these multimedia data are transmitting through a network. In other words, the NIF system is a network grid that consists of network nodes processing data collectively and on-the-fly. The NIF can automate sensor data processing, while significantly reducing required resources (bandwidth, storage, processing power, latency, etc.). In addition to the Homeland Security's surveillance information network management applications, the increased efficiency and simplicity of automated sensor data processing provided by NIF can have other security and monitoring applications, including: battlespace situation and threat assessment, terrorist video surveillance, perimeter defense, and equipment maintenance.

H-SB06.1-009
MANAGING MULTI-MEDIA SURVEILLANCE INFORMATION NETWORKS

NBCHC060140 0613017
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Adaptive camera to display mappings using computer vision

Polar Rain Inc
1427 Cerro Verde
San Jose, CA 95120-4910

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,952.77

The video surveillance industry is experiencing dramatic change with the move from analog to digital video. Command centers need to have coordinated viewing of multiple camera feeds at one time, and the ability to switch automatically between feeds and display relevant patterns. Conventional security control rooms include a bank of monitors connected through a switch to an array of security cameras. Fixed protocols are used to cycle the cameras through the monitors, with provisions for human over-ride. Advances in display technology and high speed networks motivate us to propose a radically new model of the human/display interface in the control room. We propose general techniques, based on computer vision algorithms for measuring the saliency of surveillance videos, for mapping video cameras to display space (resulting in variable amounts of display space per camera), and for visualizing the information in each video stream. The computer vision techniques involve statistical characterization of patterns of movements to develop measures of movement saliency (to control the camera to display space mapping), and perceptual modeling of video content to drive the visualization of an individual video stream. We describe a pilot user study to evaluate these ideas.

H-SB06.1-010
NON-NUCLEAR SOURCES OR TECHNIQUES TO REPLACE NUCLEAR SOURCES IN COMMERCIAL (NON-MEDICAL) APPLICATIONS

NBCHC060121 0611038
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Dielectric Relaxation Analyzing Gauge

Physical Optics Corporation
20600 Gramercy Place, Building 100
Torrance, CA 90501-1821

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$149,995.00

To reduce the amount of radioactive material in common use for commercial applications and thus improve public security, the DNDO is seeking replacements for devices that commonly incorporate such material. Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Dielectric Relaxation Analyzing Gauge (DRAG) that will replace isotope-based gauges for thickness, level, and velocity measurements in materials such as polymers, glasses, and ceramics. The device implements improved time domain dielectric spectrometry. In addition to a simple capacitive probe, it contains a microcontroller-based data acquisition and processing board with digital output. DRAG determines the peak value of dielectric losses in the monitored material, which is proportional to the amount of this material between the electrodes of the capacitive probe; therefore, the signal is similar to the attenuation of radiation in an isotope gauge. The proposed device will not only replace isotope-based industrial gauging devices that consume ~50 kg of isotopes annually, but will have significant advantages such as the capability to simultaneously measure flow rate and/or to distinguish nonuniformity in materials. The project will result in the fabrication of a dielectrometric gauge and a demonstration of how it can replace isotope gauges.