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Awards

Topic Information Award/Contract Number Proposal Information Company Performance
Period
Award/Contract
Value
Abstract

H-SB011.1-002
Preparation of Environmental Samples for Biological Detection

D11PC20136 1111109
(FY11.1 Phase I)
Membrane Cascade for Environmental Sample Separation and Concentration

Synkera Technologies Inc.
2605 Trade Centre Ave, Suite C
Longmont, CO 80503-4605

05/15/2011
to
11/30/2011
$99,921.00

This project aims to develop a membrane cascade for separation and concentration of biological components from environmental sample. The membrane cascade will compose a miniaturized, disposable module that can be integrated with many types of automated and/or portable biological detection systems. The membrane cascade is based on a unique nanoceramic materials platform, in which precise size-based separation of biological components (cells, viruses, and exogenous material) can be accomplished via pores diameters that are well controlled in the range of 5 to 200 nanometers. This membrane technology is robust, simple to use, and very low cost. Phase I will demonstrate feasibility of using ceramic membranes of various pore sizes to perform the required separation of large particulates, cells, viruses, exogenous material, and smaller chemicals. In a Phase I option, a breadboard prototype of the membrane cascade module will be built and evaluated.

H-SB011.1-006
Improved Firefighter Face Piece Lenses for Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

D11PC20145 1111040
(FY11.1 Phase I)
Improved Firefighter Face Piece Lenses for Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

PolyNew, Inc
1021 18th St
Golden, CO 80401-1826

05/15/2011
to
11/30/2011
$100,000.00

This project develops superior, higher heat resistant plastic materials for use in face shields of personal protective equipment (PPE). To do so, a strategic partnership is formed between PolyNew Inc., a woman-owned small business, and Honeywell International, the leading global supplier of personal protective equipment. Additional expertise and facilities are captured through the inclusion of academic consultants at the Colorado School of Mines. Global markets for personal protective equipment is expected to reach USD 33.3 billion by the year 2015. Driven by rising focus to combat terrorism, global markets for respiratory protection equipment is projected to reach USD 3.8 billion by 2012. Importantly, the proposed work also provides the opportunity for social value creation as well as financial profitability. The outcome from overstressed protective equipment is potentially catastrophic; in fact some fatalities have been attributed to the failure of face shield materials. Accordingly, the significance of the proposal includes alleviating human suffering and enhancing National security. In light of persistent hostility by fringe groups committed to violent acts, America`s firefighters and first responders deserve the absolute best protection technology can provide. Developing and successfully commercializing such next-generation protective technology is the goal of this multi-phase SBIR project.

H-SB013.1-003
Burn-Saver Device

HSHQDC-13-C-00042 HSHQDC-13-R-00009-H-SB013.1-003-0004-I
(HSHQDC-13-R-00009 Phase I)
Helmet-Mounted Thermal Sensor for First Responder Burn-Saver Device

TDA Research, Inc.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1916

05/01/2013
to
10/31/2013
$100,000.00

The personal protective equipment (PPE) worn by firefighters (turnout Gear, SCBA, helmet, etc.) protects the wearer against burns and hazardous environments. Unfortunately, they work so well that they decrease the firefighter's situational awareness, in particular their ability to notice rapidly increasing temperatures. Although current thermal sensor technologies (generally built in to the Personal Alert Safety System (PASS) unit) have the ability to respond to changing temperatures, no commercial devices can respond fast enough to ensure that the firefighter is not exposed to temperatures that exceed the capabilities of their PPE. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) proposes to design, fabricate, and test a rapidly responding temperature warning device that is low cost, portable, durable, and accurate. In the event of a high temperature situation, the device will provide both visual and audible alarms along with wireless notification to the command center. In collaboration with our commercial PPE manufacturing partner, we will develop a low cost, rugged, burn saver device for NFPA certification. We anticipate a TRL(1) at the beginning of Phase I to transition to TRL(4) at the end of Phase I, and we expect to achieve TRL(6) by the conclusion of Phase II.

H-SB013.1-004
GPS Disruption Detection and Localization

HSHQDC-13-C-00030 HSHQDC-13-R-00009-H-SB013.1-004-0010-I
(HSHQDC-13-R-00009 Phase I)
GPS JLOC Sensor Suite for Critical Infrastructure

NAVSYS Corporation
14960 Woodcarver Road
Colorado Springs, CO 80921-2370

05/01/2013
to
10/31/2013
$99,999.99

Timing and position data from civil GPS receivers have become integral to the operation of many of the Nation's critical infrastructures. Through the Patriot Watch architecture, DHS is coordinating efforts to identify, locate, and attribute domestic GPS interference, maintain a central database for reports of domestic and international interference to civil use of GPS and its augmentations, and notify departments and agencies of GPS interference. Under this SBIR effort we shall survey existing use of GPS in critical infrastructure within the energy and financial sector. Based on our prior experience working with the Air Force on the vulnerability of civil GPS receivers, we shall highlight leverage points of the critical infrastructure that could vulnerable to a GPS cyber attack. Using this analysis we shall develop requirements for GPS jammer or spoofer detection and localization features that could be used to protect critical infrastructure from GPS cyber attacks. We shall develop a design for a Phase II SDR sensor system, compatible with the existing JLOC Server in use as part of the Patriot watch architecture that can be used to protect against the threats identified from our survey results. In the final report we shall document the proposed Phase II test plan and the design of the planned JLOC sensor network that will be field tested and assessed for reliability and effectiveness at detecting, reporting and providing the timely localization of GPS disruptive events under the Phase II effort. Analysis of the expected JLOC sensor performance will be provided (TRL 3).

H-SB014.2-001
Decontamination Technologies for Biological Agents

HSHQDC-14-C-00049 HSHQDC-14-R-00035-H-SB014.2-001-0009-I
(HSHQDC-14-R-00035 Phase I)
Photochemical ClO2 Decontaminant for Biological Agent Neutralization

TDA Research, Inc.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1916

09/01/2014
to
02/28/2015
$100,000.00

DHS requires the ability to respond to an attack with biological agents. Specifically, it requires a decontaminant to kill anthrax spores on building exteriors and interiors, and other surfaces. In this proposal we describe an innovative bio-agent decon technology that is particularly suitable for decon over wide areas; and as far as we are aware, no other technology in development can be used on such a large scale. This proposed technology has already demonstrated efficacy against chemical warfare agent simulants and anthrax surrogates. In this proposed DHS project, we would adapt and demonstrate a product currently in commercial development to meet the important needs for a national security biological warfare agent decontaminant.

H-SB017.1-006
Wearable Chemical Sensor Badge

HSHQDC-17-C-00031 HSHQDC-17-R-00010-H-SB017.1-006-0014-I
(HSHQDC-17-R-00010 Phase I)
Wearable Smart Chemical Sensors

TDA Research, Inc.
12345 W. 52nd Ave.
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1916

05/01/2017
to
10/31/2017
$100,000.00

Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs) are chemical substances that produce toxic effects if given in sufficient quantities and/or exposed for long durations. TICs are a great concern for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) since it would be easier for terrorists to obtain and use than CAs. There are many commercially available handheld and personal gas monitors to monitor TICs. However, the multi-gas monitors are all bulky (more than 0.75 inches in thickness) and expensive ($500 or more) and they are only used by cities which have a population of 100k or more. Hence, there is a need a low cost multi-gas sensor that costs less than $50 in a wearable form factor. Such wearable sensors will also find use in the much bigger industrial market to monitor worker safety. In this SBIR Project TDA Research, in collaboration with Texas Tech University (TTU), proposes to develop a simple, low cost wearable smart chemical sensor badge that has high sensitivity and selectivity to multiple TICs at trace (low parts per million) concentrations and triggers distinct alarms at permissible exposure limit (PEL), short term exposure limit (STEL) and Time Weighted Average (TWA) concentrations. The wearable smart sensor badge uses a Lab-on-a-chip that will be smaller than 4cm x 4cm x 1 cm and can detect multiple TICs of interest and have a low rate of false alarms, so that easy and widespread deployment can be achieved.

H-SB04.1-001
New System/Technologies to Detect Low Vapor Pressure Chemicals (e.g., TICs)

NBCHC040062 04110096
(FY04.1 Phase I)
Portable detector for low vapor pressure toxic chemicals

Synkera Technologies Inc.
2605 Trade Centre Ave, Suite C
Longmont, CO 80503-4605

04/01/2004
to
10/15/2004
$100,000.00

Synkera Technologies proposes to develop an innovative new field detector for low vapor pressure toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). This detector will be based upon the integration of a unique low power pre-concentrator with an array of solid state electrochemical sensors. The solid state electrochemical sensors will be based upon the use of solid polymer electrolytes with microband electrodes. The sensor arrays will be built by a novel scalable process that results in very small, low cost and high performance sensors. These arrays of sensors will be able to detect and classify a wide range of TICs. The ultimate detector design will be focused on the development of a small, lightweight rugged and inexpensive instrument that could be used to identify low vapor pressure TICs in many diverse locations.

H-SB04.1-002
Chem-Bio Sensors Employing Novel Receptor Scaffolds

NBCHC040075 04110190
(FY04.1 Phase I)
Photoaptamers as Capture Reagents for Biological Agents

SomaLogic, Inc.
1745 38th Street
Boulder, CO 80301-

04/01/2004
to
10/15/2004
$98,280.00

Antibodies are the prototypical capture reagent for biological agents (proteins and pathogens). However, despite their advantages, antibodies also have significant disadvantages with respect to shelf life, production reproducibility and, less importantly, cost. Alternative receptor scaffolds, such as nucleic acid-based photoaptamers, offer similar performance characteristics to antibodies but without the attendant drawbacks that are common to protein-based capture reagents. Furthermore, photoaptamers can detect their targets at concentrations in the low femtomolar range. SomaLogic, Inc. can design and build a simple, user-friendly, inexpensive laboratory-based analytical system that has, as its cornerstone, a photoaptamer microarray that can capture with high specificity and sensitivity the targets of interest. It will incorporate elution buffers that can be used to elute the proteins and / or pathogens of interest off of standard air filters, water filters, swabs, swipes or other sample collection devices and the necessary laboratory equipment, reagents and SOPs required for sample analysis. It will utilize standard analytical laboratory fluid handling systems for chip processing, and a standard microarray fluorescent chip reader for protein and /or pathogen detection. Finally, the entire analytical system could be assembled using existing technology within a 2-3 year time horizon.<br><br>The specific objectives of this Phase I project are:<br><br>Technical Objective #1: Demonstrate functional utility of photoaptamer arrays: dynamic range and limits of detection.<br><br>Technical Objective #2: Demonstrate superiority of photoaptamers to antibodies with respect to thermal and chemical stability.<br><br>Technical Objective #3: Demonstrate the ability to optimize specificity and affinity of our photoaptamer arrays for at least one protein target relative to other closely related proteins.<br>

H-SB04.1-005
Marine Asset Tag Tracking System

NBCHC040054 04110209
(FY04.1 Phase I)
Adaptation of Advanced Technology for Ordnance Surveillance to a Marine Asset Tag Tracking System

Phase IV Engineering, Inc.
2820 Wilderness Place, Suite C
Boulder, CO 80301-

04/01/2004
to
09/15/2004
$99,518.76

In Phase I, Phase IV proposes to develop the overall architecture and design of a prototype RF system for shipping containers that will operate in the marine environment while being loaded stacked aboard ship, on board deck of a ship in a stack, unloaded, and moved and stacked in shipping terminals. Phase IV has developed a state-of-the-art RF system for tracking and monitoring munitions, both at land and at sea, for NAVSEA. The Advanced Technology Ordnance System (ATOS) includes active RF tags, fixed readers, and handheld readers. The tags have advanced power management; 4Mb of memory; IP-67 packaging (capable of immersion in water for 30 minutes); temperature, humidity, and shock sensing; and programmable alerts. The fixed readers have Ethernet interfaces and can be daisy chained to cover a wide perimeter. The handheld readers are derivatives of a COTS Pocket PC data collection device. Phase IV has also developed the Barrier Communication System (BCS) for wireless transmission through metal container walls. Phase IV proposes to adapt and commercialize the ATOS and BCS technology for a production marine asset tag tracking system. Phase IV is prepared to demonstrate the ATOS and BCS system to HSARPA upon request.

H-SB06.1-004
SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR A SOUTHERN BORDER SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

NBCHC060119 0613014
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Border Surveillance

PercepTek
12395 North Mead Way
Littleton, CO 80125-9782

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$99,967.68

The 1400 mile southern border of the United States has historically been difficult to secure due to the vast stretches of land and the inhospitable nature of the terrain. This situation has resulted in a breach of our immigration laws but more importantly provides an opportunity for terrorists to illegally enter the country unobserved. Our phase I effort will demonstrate the feasibility of the signal processing for border security. Our system level approach relies on fusion of data from multiple sources to provide high probability detection and low probability false alarms across the diversity of terrain and intruder tracking over large distances. A combination of unattended ground sensors and pole mounted EO/IR sensors are used for initial intrusion detection. A highly automated UAV is used to provide tracking until the border patrol can apprehend the intruders. Three tiers of signal processing are used to achieve very high probability of detection (>98%) and low false alarm rates less than 3 per day. The three tiers are: pre-screening, object detection and classification, and evidence accumulation. During Phase I the performance of the signal processing algorithms will be measured using data collected at fouir sites along the border.

H-SB06.1-005
HUMAN DETECTOR FOR CARGO SHIPPING CONTAINERS

NBCHC060122 0611171
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Human Detector for Cargo Shipping Containers

Synkera Technologies Inc.
2605 Trade Centre Ave, Suite C
Longmont, CO 80503-4605

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$100,000.00

Detection of human stowaways in cargo containers is an area of grave concern, and the proposed project will develop a sensor module for the detection of humans hidden within cargo shipping containers. Humans hiding in shipping containers are a threat to homeland security and detectors to reliably identify the presence of individual(s) will be extremely valuable. The proposed devices will rely upon chemical sensors for the detection of humans via the ammonia given off from urine, for which improved ammonia sensors are required. Phase I will demonstrate the feasibility of improved ammonia sensors, including both laboratory and independent evaluations of the sensors in a cargo container. A subsequent Phase II effort will include design, development, fabrication, and testing of a prototype system. This system will demonstrate the capability of the device to perform as proposed in a container with both benign and challenging cargo. It will be highly reliable and affordable with sensors and electronics designed for ultra low power operation. The sensor module developed for the system will consider the harsh operating environment of intermodal shipping containers and will be able to operate satisfactorily and survive in the expected range of environmental conditions.

H-SB06.1-009
MANAGING MULTI-MEDIA SURVEILLANCE INFORMATION NETWORKS

NBCHC060141 0611168
(FY06.1 Phase I)
Networked Event and Object Correlated Multimedia System

SemQuest Inc.
1230 Arizona Sun Grove
Colorado Springs, CO 80909-3868

09/01/2006
to
03/15/2007
$100,000.00

100 cameras each with one million pixel resolution operating at 30 frames per second would require 24Gbps of bandwidth without data compression. Even at 100:1 compression the bandwidth is still large relative to existing digital systems, and this bandwidth is continuous. We propose a technology that continuously digitizes and records data from a scaleable system with 1000's of cameras. This surveillance system uses novel digital cameras which greatly reduce bandwidth and data storage requirements while increasing visibility and lowering system cost. The proposed cameras will use complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuits (ICs) designed both to capture and process images individually and to perform tracking and event triggering functions. The ICs will include efficient image comparison circuits to identify areas of interest in the surveillance field of view (FOV). Overall cost effectiveness derives from integrating new functions on the imager IC to provide a 'smart' camera and reduce infrastructure requirements. Phase I will analyze, specify, and design a CMOS imager IC meeting the system requirements. Phase II will manufacture the imager chips and demonstrate the technology in a portable system using a single computer and a single serial interface servicing up to 100 cameras.

H-SB07.1-009
Improved Solid-State Neutron Detection Devices

HSHQDC-07-C-00113 0711209
(FY07.1 Phase I)
Nanorod Array Solid-State Neutron Detectors

Synkera Technologies Inc.
2605 Trade Centre Ave, Suite C
Longmont, CO 80503-4605

09/25/2007
to
03/24/2008
$150,000.00

In this Phase I SBIR project, Synkera proposes to develop and commercialize solid-state neutron detectors of a unique architecture that will enable sensor modules for a variety of operating environment. The neutron detectors are based around nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide, and will be fabricated using a combination of gas-phase and solution-based deposition methods. The detectors will incorporate a p-n junction surrounding boron as a neutron-conversion material. A gamma-ray detector will be readily incorporated into the same monolithic piece in order to eliminate false-positives. As part of this development effort we will fabricate prototype detectors. The neutron detection efficiency of our best prototypes will be tested in collaboration with Battelle. Our solid-state neutron detectors are expected to have much larger neutron sensitivity and lower power requirements than conventional detectors. These features will enable hand held neutron detectors for customs inspection and other fissile-material detection applications. The low power requirements will also enable wireless neutron detectors for container monitoring applications. In addition, we anticipate that large detector areas can be manufactured at costs below those of conventional neutron detectors for portal screening applications.

H-SB07.2-003
Optimizing Remote Capture of Biometrics for Screening Processes

NBCHC080054 0721096
(FY07.2 Phase I)
FASST Multimodal Biometric Screening

Securics, Inc.
1867 Austin Bluffs Pkwy
Suite 200
Colorado Springs, CO 80918-7864

01/15/2008
to
07/31/2008
$100,000.00

Multimodal biometrics for screening presents unique challenges. The evaluation of them presents even more challenges. The Securics team is leveraging 7 years of effort and past DARPA HID funding, on unique biometric evaluation approaches for measuring and comparing failure/performance predictions. The approach models what is important for a particular task and then learning the coefficients of the reliability measures from empirical datasets. It extends our past work on Failure Analysis from Similarity Surface Theory. The learning/training allows the measures to adapt to population, sensor, and algorithm specific properties. The resulting algorithm can be applied in real time. The effort includes two unique approaches to experimentation for large-scale multi-modal evaluation of non-cooperative and adversarial subjects. <P> A second important and unique, aspect of our work has been the development of formal metrics for comparison of biometric reliability measures and fusion. While multiple papers develop quality-based measures and fusion techniques, there has been no paradigm or framework for quantitative comparison. This Phase I SBIR presents a unique opportunity to advance the state of the art both in multi-modal biometric data quality by developing a toolset in which different reliability can be quantitatively combined and compared on real data from real algorithms

H-SB07.2-006
Robust Algorithm Development for Multidimensional Chemical Analysis

NBCHC080063 0721069
(FY07.2 Phase I)
Robust Algorithm Development for Multidimensional Chemical Analysis

Numerica Corporation
4850 Hahns Peak Drive
Suite 200
Loveland, CO 80538-6003

01/15/2008
to
07/31/2008
$98,688.40

Highly reliable detection of hazardous materials is a fundamental part of homeland security. Arrays of simple sensors can provide much of the sensitivity and selectivity of sophisticated sensors, but without the substantial hardware overhead. Unfortunately, such arrays are not without their challenges. The selectivity of such arrays can be realized only if the data is first distilled using advanced signal processing algorithms. There are several standard mathematical approaches that have been applied to this processing and while these techniques are certainly applicable to a subset of the problems of interest, they are not ubiquitous in their effectiveness. We choose to attack such problems using algorithms from the stochastic state estimation and data fusion regimes since they address precisely the same type of underlying problem. These algorithms promise to be enablers of advanced multi-dimensional chemical analysis, allowing a transition of complexity from the sensor suite to the data processing algorithms while still maintaining robust sensitivity and selectivity for analytes of interest; the ability to effectively use simpler and easier to fabricate sensor suites has the direct effect of placing lighter, more robust equipment into the hands of first responders.

H-SB08.1-002
Miniature Chem/Bio/Explosive Sensors

HSHQDC0800074 0811087
(FY08.1 Phase I)
Miniature and Reliable Chemical Sensors

Synkera Technologies Inc.
2605 Trade Centre Ave, Suite C
Longmont, CO 80503-4605

07/30/2008
to
02/13/2009
$99,990.00

This project will develop a robust and inexpensive miniature sensor system that will enable ubiquitous chemical detection through integration into hand held devices such as cellular phones or attachment to other personal wireless devices that provide for sensor integration, geo-location, and contain an independent power supply. The sensor technology is enabled by advances in nanomaterials and ceramic micromachining and features a combination of fast response, broad selectivity and with low (ppb) detection limits without preconcentration or sampling.