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Awards

Topic Information Award/Contract Number Proposal Information Company Performance
Period
Award/Contract
Value
Abstract

H-SB05.1-003
IMPROVED HIGH PURITY GERMANIUM COOLING MECHANISMS

NBCHC050128 0511070
(FY05.1 Phase I)
Miniature, Efficient, Low-Vibration Cryocooler for Gamma Ray Detectors

Creare LLC
P.O. Box 71,
16 Great Hollow Road
Hanover, NH 03755-0071

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$99,473.60

Hand-held gamma ray spectrometers are a vital tool for detecting and identifying nuclear materials to counter the threat of radiological and nuclear terrorism. The HPGe crystals in these detectors must operate at cryogenic temperatures to achieve good energy resolution. We propose to develop an innovative, miniature cryogenic cooling system that will be ideal for hand-held detectors. High efficiency will enable long battery life, and low vibration will improve the detector sensitivity. In addition, the system will be lightweight and inexpensive to produce. In Phase I, we will prove the feasibility of our approach by building and demonstrating critical components and producing a conceptual design for a prototype cryocooler. In Phase II, we will build and demonstrate a complete prototype system. Homeland security applications include nuclear materials interdiction, safeguards inspection, and emergency response. The cooler can also be used to cool portable x-ray detectors and infrared sensors used in military targeting and guidance systems. The commercial nuclear industry can use the cooler/detector for in-situ waste assay measurements, nuclear reactor maintenance, and health physics.

H-SB05.1-003
IMPROVED HIGH PURITY GERMANIUM COOLING MECHANISMS

NBCHC060069 0512010
(FY05.1 Phase II)
Miniature, Efficient, Low-Vibration Cryocooler for Gamma Ray Detectors

Creare LLC
P.O. Box 71,
16 Great Hollow Road
Hanover, NH 03755-0071

05/01/2006
to
02/28/2009
$904,621.26

Hand-held gamma ray spectrometers are a vital tool for detecting and identifying nuclear materials to counter the threat of radiological and nuclear terrorism. The High Purity Germanium crystals in these detectors must operate at cryogenic temperatures to achieve good energy resolution. We propose to develop an innovative, miniature cryogenic cooling system that will be ideal for hand-held detectors. High efficiency will enable long battery life, and low vibration will improve detector sensitivity. The system will be lightweight and inexpensive to produce. In Phase I, we have proven the feasibility of our approach by building and demonstrating critical components and producing a conceptual design for a prototype cryocooler. In Phase II, we will build and demonstrate a complete prototype cryocooler and integrate it with a hand-held gamma ray spectrometer. Tests of the cryocooler will demonstrate high cooling efficiency, and tests of the cooled spectrometer will demonstrate excellent detector performance. Homeland security applications include nuclear materials interdiction, safeguards inspection, and emergency response. The cooler can also be used to cool portable x-ray detectors and infrared sensors used in military targeting and guidance systems. The commercial nuclear industry can use the cooler/detector for in-situ waste assay measurements, nuclear reactor maintenance, and health physics.

H-SB05.1-004
LOW COST UNDERWATER THREAT DETECTION SYSTEM

NBCHC050126 0511093
(FY05.1 Phase I)
COST-SAVING ENHANCEMENTS TO THE SWIMMER DETECTION SONAR NETWORK (SDSN)

Scientific Solutions, Inc.
99 Perimeter Road
Nashua, NH 03063-1325

06/01/2005
to
12/15/2005
$100,000.00

A low cost Swimmer Detection Sonar Network (SDSN) is now being developed under an ONR Phase 2 SBIR and as a joint project between the USA and Singapore. The SDSN is a network of inexpensive sonar nodes where narrow sonar beams are formed using air-backed parabolic reflectors. The feasibility of the system has been proven through trials conducted in Singapore harbor and full development is well underway. Currently each parabolic reflector has a single transducer at the focal point and is used for both transmission and reception. There is one parabolic reflector for each beam, with up to 10 beams per node. A substantially less complex, cheaper, and smaller node might be realized using a single wide-beam transmitter and a multi-beam air-backed spherical reflector receiver. Initial modeling shows promise. The Phase 1 effort would include more thorough modeling, testing of a multi-beam air-backed spherical reflector receiver, and design of a complete node. In Phase 2 we would build up 3 nodes and evaluate their performance against the current design. If successful this SBIR would make the SDSN even more cost effective, allowing for its use in a much broader range of applications, along with significantly increasing the commercial potential.